Daily Photos & Frugal Travel Tips

Archive for July, 2009

28 Jul

Porta Ercolano: Necropolis, Pompeii, Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 1 Street Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 2 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 3 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 4 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 5 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 6 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 7 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 8 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 9 Mamia Seat Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 10 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 11 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 12 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 13 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 14 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 15 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 16 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 17 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 18 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 19 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 20 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 21 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 22 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 23 Pompeii Italy

Porta Ercolano Necropolis 24 Street Pompeii Italy

(Taken From Official Guidebook)

Porta Ercolano: Necropolis

Uncovered in 1763-1838, the necropolis of Porta Ercolano is the city’s best known, with buildings dating from the middle of the 1st cent. BC to the 1st cent. A.D. During this period the dead were cremated and the ashes stored in an urn walled into the tomb, or buried and indicated with a marker in the shape of a human bust (columella).

Among the many burials, worthy of note are the tomb in the shape of a semicircular seat of the priestess Mamia; the large burial chambe topped by a circular aedicula, which had the statues of eminent figures of the gens Istacidia between the columns; the marble-covered altar tombs (54-68 AD) of C.Calventius Quietus (with the bisellium or dual seat, symbol of the honor granted to sit in the front row of a theatre), Naevoleia Tyche and C.Munatius Faustus (the cargo ship refers to the merchant business of the latter).

27 Jul

Porta Nocera: Necropolis, Pompeii, Italy

Porta Nocera Necropolis 1 Pompeii Italy

Porta Nocera Necropolis 2 Pompeii Italy

Porta Nocera Necropolis 3 Statues Pompeii Italy

Porta Nocera Necropolis 4 Statues Pompeii Italy

(Taken From Official Guidebook)

Porta Nocera: Necropolis

Immediately outside Porta Nocera is the necropolis, of considerable importance, with its exedra and aedicula tombs. The funerary building, dating from the Tiberian period (14-37 AD) is architecturally imposing, build by Eumachia, priestess of Venus, for herself and her family members: the exedra stands on a high terrace, with the burial chamber and fence in the back. The structure, in opus caementicium, was covered with Nocera tufa and divided into niches with statues, separated by half columns and crowned with a decorated frieze. The tomb was inserted between two other previously existing aedicula burial sites, from the late Republican period, consisting of a podium supporting the cell containing the statues of the dead.

26 Jul

Great Palaestra, Pompeii Italy

Great Palaestra 1 Entrance Pompeii Italy

Great Palaestra 2 Inside Pompeii Italy

Great Palaestra 3 Inside Pompeii Italy

(Taken From Official Guidebook)

Great Palaestra

This large, rectangular building with porticoes along three sides and a pool in the center is from the Augustan period: it provided an exercise park for the youth associations promoted by the emperor’s propaganda, and here the latter was worshiped in a room at the center of the west portico. Along the portico, a double row of sycamores (of whose roots plaster casts have been made) ensured an additional area of shade. The portals on the east side were damaged by the earthquake in 62 AD, and were rebuilt in opus latericium. At the time of the eruption, the north wall had collapsed and recently been restored; on the south side is the entrance to a latrine, cleaned by water carried from the pool by a canal.

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